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August 2020

Peripheral artery disease or more commonly known as PAD, is a condition that causes poor circulation to the lower limbs due to plaque buildup in the arteries. This arterial plaque buildup causes the arteries to harden and narrow, leading to reduced blood flow to the affected areas. If severe enough, blocked blood flow can cause gangrene. In severe cases, this can lead to leg amputation.Some people are at an increased risk of developing PAD. The main risk factor for developing PAD is smoking or having a history of smoking. Other risk factors include having a history of diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, ischemic heart disease, stroke, and metabolic syndrome. If you have any of these risk factors, discuss them with a podiatrist, who can monitor the health of your lower limbs and screen for PAD. 

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Francis Kania, DPM from Illinois. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heal
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Westchester, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 17 August 2020 00:00

Strengthening Flat Feet

Flat feet often don’t cause any symptoms, however, they can make you more likely to develop foot problems over time. If you want to keep your feet healthy and in good condition, there are many stretching and strengthening exercises that you can try. Toe Scrunches work out the small muscles of the feet, making them stronger and more flexible at the arch. To do Toe Scrunches, place a towel on the floor and put your feet directly on top of it. Using only your toes, scrunch up the towel by moving your toes inward towards the balls of your feet. Another exercise you can do is called Can-Rolling. Sit on a chair and place a can lying down on the floor in front of you. Put your foot on top of the can so that the can is under your arch, then roll the can back and forth using your foot. This exercise stretches your feet while relieving tension and pressure. For more exercise ideas and information on strengthening flat feet, consult with a podiatrist.

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact Francis Kania, DPM from Illinois. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms

  • Pain around the heel or arch area
  • Trouble standing on the tip toe
  • Swelling around the inside of the ankle
  • Flat look to one or both feet
  • Having your shoes feel uneven when worn

Treatment

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Westchester, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 10 August 2020 00:00

Heel Pain 101

The heel is designed to absorb the impact of body weight, and when pain develops, it can be disabling and affect other aspects of the body and life. Heel pain is usually the result of small repetitive injuries that are unable to heal, which then form into a bigger mechanical issue. These issues can include plantar fasciitis, heel bumps, tarsal tunnel syndrome, a fracture, Achilles tendonitis or heel spurs. Some self-care options for heel pain include wearing comfortable shoes, wearing shoes with good cushioning, minimizing walking on hard surfaces, or losing weight. If heel pain lasts longer than a few weeks, it is important to consult with a podiatrist in case the injury is more severe. A podiatrist will be able to properly diagnose and treat the source of the heel pain.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Francis Kania, DPM of Illinois. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Westchester, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Heel Pain

If you are suffering from tenderness, pain, or stiffness in the joints of your feet or ankles, call us to schedule an appointment.

Plantar fasciitis refers to a painful inflammation of the plantar fascia, a tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot, connecting the heel bone to the ball of the foot. The most common cause of this condition is overuse, making it a frequent injury among runners and other athletes. Certain people may be predisposed to plantar fasciitis, including people with flat feet, tight calves or tight Achilles tendons, and those who wear low-quality running shoes. Resting, stretching, doing strength exercises, and wearing the appropriate footwear can help alleviate symptoms. However, it is strongly recommended that you visit a podiatrist if you are prone to this injury. A podiatrist can determine the cause of your recurrent plantar fasciitis, provide you with treatment options, and help you find appropriate running shoes or prescribe orthotics.

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Francis Kania, DPM from Illinois. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Westchester, IL . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
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